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Informed Consent when seeking medical treatment

Jumbled paragraph sentences. Rearrange these sentences to construct a logical paragraph. Notice the clues within sentences which assist you to make your choices.

That is, consent must be freely given without any coercion or pressure from anyone including medical practitioners or family members.

Informed consent is the knowing consent of an individual to decide whether or not to undertake tests or a medical procedure and the ability to understand the risks and benefits of that medical treatment (Crisp & Taylor, 2009; Wagner, 2010).

Individuals who have diminished responsibility because of mental incapacity or age can not give informed consent.
                                                                                       
The final element is that consent must be voluntary.

The first is the patient’s intellectual ability to make decisions, that is, to have the intellectual ability to understand the options and the consequences of each option.

There are four components to informed consent.

The second requisite is that the medical practitioner must disclose enough information in a way that allows the patient to make a rational decision regarding tests or treatment and the benefits and risks that each entails.

The next essential element is competency which is the ability to comprehend the information and to be held responsible for the decision made.

 

Sample Corrent Answer - Comments from Lecturer:

Informed consent is the ability of an individual to understand the risks and benefits of undertaking medical tests or medical treatments (Crisp & Taylor, 2009; Wagner, 2010). Informed consent includes the patient's awareness of options to treatments and the likely outcomes and the associated risks (Carey-Hazell, 2005). There are four elements to informed consent. The first is the patient's intellectual ability to make decisions, that is, to have the intellectual ability to understand the options and the consequences of each option. Individuals who have diminished responsibility because of mental incapacity or age can not give informed consent. The second requisite is that the medical practitioner must disclose enough information in a way that allows the patient to make a rational decision regarding tests or treatment and the benefits and risks that each entails. The next essential element is competency which is the ability to comprehend the information and to be held responsible for the decision made. The final element is that consent must be voluntary. That is, consent must be freely given without any coercion or pressure from anyone including medical practitioners or family members (Crisp & Taylor, 2009; Wagner, 2010).

Source:

Carey- Hazell, K. (2005). Improving patient information and decision making. Australian Health Consumer 1, 2005-2006, 21-22. Retrieved April 14, 2010 from http://www.chf.org.au/pdfs/ahc/ahc-2005-1-improving-patient-information.pdf#search="informed consent"
Crisp, J., & Taylor, C. (2009). Potter & Perry's Fundamentals of nursing. (3rd ed.). Mosby: Sydney.
Wagner, R.A. (2010). Informed Consent. Retrieved February10, 2010 from http://www.emedicinehealth.com/informed_consent/page13_em.htm

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